Skip to main content

Dr Efpraxia Zamani & Dr Laura Sbaffi conduct GCRF fieldwork in Malawi

Between June 18th and June 24th, Dr Efpraxia Zamani and Dr Laura Sbaffi travelled to Malawi to carry out fieldwork for their GCRF QR Pump Priming grant on promoting support networks for informal caregivers of people living with HIV in Malawi. The project focuses on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal #3: ‘Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages’, and seeks to develop a collaborative network among caregivers, academics, NGOs, local authorities and health trusts for the support of caregivers of people living with HIV/AIDS in Malawi.


Malawi is third in world-wide rankings with respect to HIV-related deaths (more than 35,000 deaths in 2017), with 10.6% of the adult population in 2016 being affected by HIV. HIV/AIDS requires a lot of self-management for monitoring symptoms and conducting a healthy lifestyle, while being self-reliant. As a result, considerable support is required to help patients make decisions, adjust their behaviour and adapt to their condition.


Efpraxia and Laura conducted two separate research activities while in Malawi. The first one was a focus group with ten local family caregivers looking after one or more family members living with HIV. The participants were asked to describe their experience of being a carer, the extent of their support network and the dynamics and perceptions of their local community. The focus group was touching and enlightening, as the participants shared honest and candid recounts of their lives and of that of their loved ones. While caregiving can be self-fulfilling, it can also be taxing, emotionally and financially, with caregivers experiencing exhaustion, burnout, and self-sacrifice.


The second activity involved a workshop, which brought together caregivers, academics, local community chiefs, and NGOs working directly or indirectly with HIV/AIDS patients and caregivers, with the aim to establish a collaborative network toward supporting, empowering and promoting the wellbeing of informal caregivers. During the workshop, the participating partners discussed their activities and their general priorities for the support of HIV/AIDS patients and caregivers. The discussion then facilitated ascertaining specific activities that can be developed and pursued by the partners to address the identified caregivers’ needs. Efpraxia and Laura are now working with all partners in order to identify avenues for further funded research projects to implement pilot support activities. This will help to reinforce the collaborative network just established and, most importantly, will suggest ways to materialise the priorities identified at the workshop, and provide tangible support to informal caregivers in the near future.


Both activities took place in Namwera, a locality within the Mangochi district, in the southern region of Malawi.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

New Article: Services for Student Well-Being in Academic Libraries: Three Challenges

Services for Student Well-Being in Academic Libraries: Three Challenges
Our Director of Research and Senior Lecturer, Dr Andrew Cox, has published a new article alongside Dr Liz Brewster at Lancaster University.

There has been a wave of interest in UK academic libraries in developing services to support student well-being. This paper identifies three fundamental and interrelated issues that need to be addressed to make such initiatives effective and sustainable. Firstly, well-being has to be defined and the impacts of
interventions must be measured in appropriate ways. Secondly, there is a need to identify the true nature of the underlying social problem around well-being. Thirdly, relevant approaches to the issue need to be located within the professional knowledge base of librarianship.
To read the article, click here.

Joint PhD presentation between Sheffield and Makerere, Uganda, delivered by Liliana Sepulveda Garcia

Last week saw the first presentation in a series of joint talks between the Information School's Health Informatics and Information Systems Research Groups in Sheffield. and Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda.The talks aim to promote research collaboration and knowledge sharing.

Dr Laura Sbaffi and Dr Efpraxia Zamani are organising this series and chairing the Sheffield presentations, and Prof Josephine Nabukenya will be chairing the presentations from Makerere.

In this first session, PhD student Liliana Sepulveda offered the audience a great overview of her PhD research on "An experiential study of the human-technology relationship between informal caregivers of people with dementia and assistive technologies".


There will be similar virtual meetings every month and the next schedule one is for Tuesday 11th June, when a PhD student from Makerere will be presenting their work. More details will be forthcoming.

You can view the recording of the session here: https://di…

PhD student Gianmarco Ghiandoni presents at UK-QSAR conference

Gianmarco Ghiandoni, PhD student in our Chemoinformatics research group, recently attended and presented at the UK-QSAR conference in Cambridge.

Gianmarco attended the conference and presented a part of his PhD project, which involves the development of "Reaction Class Recommender Systems in de novo Drug Design".

'These algorithms are machine learning models that have recently acquired great importance due to their effectiveness in product recommendation', Gianmarco said. 'In particular, companies such as Amazon, Netflix, Spotify, etc., have built their reputations and businesses on the top of these models. At Sheffield, we have decided to apply these methods in order to produce suggestions for decision making in automated molecular design. The results from their application indicate that recommender systems can improve the synthetic accessibility of the designed molecules whilst reducing the computational requirements.'