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Professor Paul Clough organises Supporting Discovery of Archival Collections: Challenges and Opportunities workshop

A workshop on Supporting Discovery of Archival Collections: Challenges and Opportunities has been organised by Professor Paul Clough  of the Information School, along with Chris Hilton (Wellcome Trust) and Sarah Higgins and Pauline Rafferty (Aberystwyth University).

This one-day meeting is being held 10am-4pm 8th July 2016, Wellcome Trust, London and includes attendees from BBC Archives, The British Library, Bletchley Park and Houses of Parliament.

The one day meeting is for representatives from library and archives communities will discuss the issues surrounding the provision of effective access to digital archives and/or online archives catalogues. It will provide an opportunity to share and discuss discovery challenges and new ways of designing the archives search experience, such as: identifying user groups, their information needs and tasks; the provision of information access to digital collections beyond the search box; helping users make sense of results (especially hierarchical delivery and display) ); and the kinds of features that would help engage users and facilitate learning . Through attendee presentations and small-group discussions we aim to develop an experience based roadmap for follow-up activities regarding the re-design of  archives resource discovery.
 

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